The User Experience Design Manifesto

Organizations—not designers—design everything.

Just as your best thinker improves everything, that one person in your organization who doesn’t understand the user experience creates a drag on every product or service you produce. To create better experiences, you have to create better organizations. You have to improve your organization’s design literacy. You have to improve the design literacy of everyone in the group.

Common barriers stop the design of better experiences.

These barriers — value, focus, time, memory, talent, process, and improvement — represent the distance between you and the balanced teams your organization needs to create better experiences. Sometimes these cultural barriers are codified into your organization’s process. Sometimes they exist as hidden assumptions in your team member's minds. But you can overcome all of them to improve your organization's design literacy.

Better organizations to enable better design.

Your design activities don’t change. Change how you work with your team. Change how you work, so your goal is always a better organization instead of a better product. Change how you accomplish the design, so that you are always improving your team’s design literacy.

 

About the manifesto

Since 2005 I've watched all kinds of teams — agile, lean, waterfall — at startups, agencies, and enterprises. This shifted my UX practice from improving design to improving organizations, revealing these three principles.

Translations

Brazilian Portuguese (by Daniel Souza for Web Insider)

Spanish (by Sergio Ortega)

Serbo-Croatian (by Jovana Milutinovich for Web Hosting Geeks)